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Now [arXiv timezone]: Tue 10 Dec 00:35 / Requested listing: Tue 10 Dec / Checking submissions between Fri 6 Dec and Mon 9 Dec [EST]
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This page allows you to scan the arXiv listings for selected keywords. A score around 100 is probably your own paper!

How to use
- Use the settings at the bottom of the page and bookmark the resulting link as it appears.
Tips & examples
- Submissions not matching your keywords can be accessed with a button below the results. / Keywords are looked for in the summary but also in the title and in the authors names. / Links open by default in a new tab. / If you use several custom links, give them a name using the optional parameter for the bookmarks to be explicit.
- example link

- Try also
arxivsorter as a complementary tool (based on author network).
from www.mrbilly.com

Keywords:
galaxies
Categories:
astro-ph*


Number of submissions with keyword match: 21/135, including 13 new submissions



Submissions with keyword match



Comments: 22 pages, 14 figures, accepted by ApJ

Hassen M. Yesuf, S. M. Faber, David C. Koo, Joanna Woo, Joel R. Primack, Yifei Luo
We use bulge-type classifications of 809 representative SDSS galaxies by Gadotti (2009) to classify a large sample of galaxies into real bulges (classical or elliptical) and pseudobulges using Random Forest. We use structural and stellar population predictors that can easily be measured without image decomposition. Multiple parameters such as the central mass density with 1 kpc, concentration index, S\'{e}rsic index and velocity dispersion do result in accurate bulge classifications when combined together. We classify $\sim 44,500$ face-on galaxies above stellar mass of 10$^{10}$ M$_\odot$ and redshift $ 0.02 < z < 0.07$ into real bulges or pseudobulges with $93 \pm 2$\% accuracy. We show that $\sim 75 - 90\%$ of AGNs identified by the optical line ratio diagnostic are hosted by real bulges. The pseudobulge fraction significantly decreases with AGN signature as the line ratios change from indicating pure star formation ($\sim 54 \pm 4$ \%), to composite of star formation and AGN ($\sim 18 \pm 3$\%), and to AGN-dominated galaxies ($\sim 5 \pm 3$\%). Using the dust-corrected [\ion{O}{3}] luminosity as an AGN accretion indicator, and the stellar mass and radius as proxies for a black hole mass, we find that AGNs in real bulges have lower Eddington ratios than AGNs in pseudobulges. Real bulges have a wide range of AGN and star formation activities, although most of them are weak AGNs. For both bulge-types, their Eddington ratios are correlated with specific star formation rates (SSFR). Real bulges have lower specific accretion rate but higher AGN fraction than pseudobulges do at similar SSFRs.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03633v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03633. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-08 02:30 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [10.2/7.3]





Comments: 15 pages, 18 figures. Submitted to MNRAS

Madeline A. Marshall, Yueying Ni, Tiziana Di Matteo, J. Stuart B. Wyithe, Stephen Wilkins, Rupert A. C. Croft
We examine the properties of the host galaxies of $z=7$ quasars using the large volume, cosmological hydrodynamical simulation BlueTides. We find that the most massive black holes and quasars are hosted by massive galaxies with stellar masses $\log(M_\ast/M_\odot)=10.8\pm0.2$, and $10.2\pm0.4$, which have a wide range of star formation rates, of $50\substack{+119 \\ -35}M_\odot/\rm{yr}$ and $19\substack{+28 \\ -12}M_\odot/\rm{yr}$, respectively. The hosts of the most massive black holes and quasars in BlueTides are generally bulge-dominated, with bulge-to-total mass ratio $B/T\simeq0.85\pm0.1$, however their morphologies are not biased relative to the overall $z=7$ galaxy sample. We find that the hosts of the most massive black holes and quasars are significantly more compact, with half-mass radii $R_{0.5}=0.29\substack{+0.15 \\ -0.10}$ kpc and $0.28\substack{+0.08 \\ -0.06}$ kpc respectively, relative to galaxies with similar masses, which have $R_{0.5}=0.5\substack{+0.3 \\ -0.2}$ kpc. We make mock James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) images of these quasars and their host galaxies. We find that distinguishing the host from the quasar emission will be possible but still challenging with JWST, due to the small sizes of quasar hosts. We find that currently observable quasar samples are biased tracers of the intrinsic black hole--stellar mass relations, following a relation that is 0.27 dex higher than that of the full galaxy sample. Finally, we find that black hole hosts are generally quite isolated. However, the most massive black holes are more likely to be found in denser environments than the typical $M_{\textrm{BH}}>10^{6.5}M_\odot$ black hole, indicating that minor mergers at least play some role in growing black holes in the early Universe.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03428v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03428. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-06 22:51 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [10.1/7.3]





Comments: 16 pages, 8 figures, 1 table, accepted by ApJ

Po-Feng Wu, Arjen van der Wel, Rachel Bezanson, Anna Gallazzi, Camilla Pacifici, Caroline M. S. Straatman, Ivana Barisic, Eric F. Bell, Priscilla Chauke, Francesco D'Eugenio, Marijn Franx, Adam Muzzin, David Sobral, Josha van Houdt
We analyze the colors and sizes of 32 quiescent (UVJ-selected) galaxies with strong Balmer absorption ($\mbox{EW}(H\delta) \geq 4$\AA) at $z\sim0.8$ drawn from DR2 of the LEGA-C survey to test the hypothesis that these galaxies experienced compact, central starbursts before quenching. These recently quenched galaxies, usually referred to as post-starburst galaxies, span a wide range of colors and we find a clear correlation between color and half-light radius, such that bluer galaxies are smaller. We build simple toy models to explain this correlation: a normal star-forming disk plus a central, compact starburst component. Bursts with exponential decay timescale of $\sim$~100 Myr that produce $\sim10\%$ to more than 100\% of the pre-existing masses can reproduce the observed correlation. More significant bursts also produce bluer and smaller descendants. Our findings imply that when galaxies shut down star formation rapidly, they generally had experienced compact, starburst events and that the large, observed spread in sizes and colors mostly reflects a variety of burst strengths. Recently quenched galaxies should have younger stellar ages in the centers; multi-wavelength data with high spatial resolution are required to reveal the age gradient. Highly dissipative processes should be responsible for this type of formation history. While determining the mechanisms for individual galaxies is challenging, some recently quenched galaxies show signs of gravitational interactions, suggesting that mergers are likely an important mechanism in triggering the rapid shut-down of star-formation activities at $z\sim0.8$.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03683v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03683. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-08 08:59 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [11.1/0]





Comments:

Chen-Fatt Lim, Wei-Hao Wang, Ian Smail, Douglas Scott, Chian-Chou Chen, Yu-Yen Chang, James M. Simpson, Yoshiki Toba, Xinwen Shu, Dave Clements, Josh Greenslade, YiPing Ao, Arif Babul, Jack Birkin, Scott C. Chapman, Tai-An Cheng et al. 
We construct a SCUBA-2 450-$\mu$m map in the COSMOS field that covers an area of 300 arcmin$^{2}$ and reaches a 1$\sigma$ noise level of 0.65 mJy in the deepest region. We extract 256 sources detected at 450 $\mu$m with signal-to-noise ratio $>$ 4.0 and analyze the physical properties of their multi-wavelength counterparts. We find that most of the sources are at $z\lesssim3$, with a median of $z = 1.79^{+0.03}_{-0.15}$. About $35^{+32}_{-25}$% of our sources are classified as starburst galaxies based on their total star-formation rates (SFRs) and stellar masses ($M_{\ast}$). By fitting the far-infrared spectral energy distributions, we find that our 450-$\mu$m-selected sample has a wide range of dust temperatures (20 K $ \lesssim T_{\rm d} \lesssim$ 60 K), with a median of ${T}_{\rm d} = 38.3^{+0.4}_{-0.9}$ K. We do not find a redshift evolution in dust temperature for sources with $L_{\rm IR}$ > $10^{12}$ $\rm L_\odot$ at $z<3$. However, we find a moderate correlation where dust temperature increases with the deviation from the SFR-$M_{\ast}$ relation. The increase in dust temperature also correlates with optical morphology, which is consistent with merger-triggered starbursts in sub-millimeter galaxies. Our galaxies do not show the tight IRX-$\beta_{\rm UV}$ correlation that has been observed in the local Universe. We construct the infrared luminosity functions of our 450-$\mu$m sources and measure their comoving SFR densities. The contribution of the $L_{\rm IR}$ > $10^{12}$ $\rm L_\odot$ population to the SFR density rises dramatically from $z$ = 0 to 2 ($\propto$ ($1+z$)$^{3.9\pm1.1}$) and dominates the total SFR density at $z \gtrsim 2$.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03669v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03669. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-08 07:19 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [9.9/0]





Comments:

Yueying Ni, Tiziana Di Matteo, Roberto Gilli, Rupert A. C. Croft, Yu Feng, Colin Norman
High-$z$ AGNs hosted in gas rich galaxies are expected to grow through significantly obscured accretion phases. This may limit or bias their observability. In this work, we use \textsc{BlueTides}, a large volume cosmological simulation of galaxy formation to examine quasar obscuration for the highest-redshift ($z \geq 7$) supermassive black holes residing in the center of galaxies. We find that for the bright quasars, most of the high column density gas ($>90\%$) resides in the innermost regions of the host galaxy, (typically within $< 10$ ckpc), while the gas in the outskirts is a minor contributor to the $N_\mathrm H$. The brightest quasars can have large angular variations in galactic obscuration, over 2 orders of magnitude, where the lines of sight with the lowest obscuration are those formed via strong gas outflows driven by AGN feedback. We find that for the overall AGN population, the mean $N_\mathrm H$ is generally larger for high luminosity and BH mass, while the $N_\mathrm H$ distribution is significantly broadened, developing a low $N_\mathrm H $ wing due to the angular variations driven by the AGN outflows/feedback. The obscured fraction P($N_{\rm H} > 10^{23} {\rm cm}^{-2}$) typically range from 0.6 to 1.0 for increasing $L_{X}$ (with $L_X > 10^{43} \rm{ergs/s}$), with no clear trend of redshift evolution. With respect to the galaxy host property, we find a linear relation between $N_{\rm H}$, $M_*$ and $M_{\rm H_2}$ with $\log N_{\rm H} = (0.24 \pm 0.03) \log M_{*} + (20.7 \pm 0.3)$ and $\log N_{\rm H} = (0.47 \pm 0.03) \log M_{\rm H_2} + (18.4 \pm 0.3)$. The dust optical depth in the UV band $\tau_{\mathrm UV}$ has tight positive correlation with $N_{\rm H}$. Our dust extincted UVLF is about 1.5 dex lower than the intrinsic UVLF, implying that more than 99\% of the $z \sim 7$ AGNs are heavily dust extincted and therefore would be missed by the UV band observation.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03780v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03780. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-08 17:40 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [5/4.9]





Comments: 27 pages, 10 figures, 3 tables; submitted to the AAS Journals

E. O. Nadler, R. H. Wechsler, K. Bechtol, Y. -Y. Mao, G. Green, A. Drlica-Wagner, M. McNanna, S. Mau, A. B. Pace, J. D. Simon, A. Kravtsov, S. Dodelson, T. S. Li, A. H. Riley, M. Y. Wang, T. M. C. Abbott et al. 
The population of Milky Way (MW) satellites contains the faintest known galaxies, and thus provides essential insight into galaxy formation and dark matter microphysics. Here, we combine a model of the galaxy--halo connection with newly derived observational selection functions based on searches for satellites in photometric surveys over nearly the entire high-Galactic-latitude sky. In particular, we use cosmological zoom-in simulations of MW-like halos that include realistic Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) analogs to fit the position-dependent MW satellite luminosity function. We report decisive evidence for the statistical impact of the LMC on the MW satellite population due to an estimated $6.5\pm 1.5$ observed LMC-associated satellites, consistent with the number of LMC satellites inferred from $\textit{Gaia}$ proper motion measurements, confirming the predictions of cold dark matter models for the existence of satellites within satellite halos. Moreover, we infer that the LMC fell into the MW within the last $2\ \rm{Gyr}$ at high confidence. Based on our detailed full-sky modeling, we find that the faintest observed satellites inhabit halos with peak virial masses below $2.2\times 10^{8}\ M_{\rm{\odot}}$ at $95\%$ confidence, and we place the first robust constraints on the fraction of halos that host galaxies in this regime. We predict that the faintest detectable satellites occupy halos with peak virial masses above $10^{6}\ M_{\rm{\odot}}$, highlighting the potential for powerful galaxy formation and dark matter constraints from future dwarf galaxy searches.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03303v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03303. Categories: astro-ph.GA,astro-ph.CO. Submission date: 2019-12-06 14:01 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [5.1/4]





Comments: 12 pages, 7 figures, accepted for publication in MNRAS

O. L. Dors, P. Freitas-Lemes, E. B. Amores, E. Perez-Montero, M. V. Cardaci, G. F. Hagele, M. Armah, A. C. Krabbe, M. Faundez-Abans
We compare the oxygen abundance (O/H) of the Narrow Line Regions (NLRs) of Seyfert 2 AGNs obtained through strong-line methods and from direct measurements of the electron temperature (Te-method). The aim of this study is to explore the effects of the use of distinct methods on the range of metallicity and on the mass-metallicity relation of AGNs at low redshifts (z < 0.4). We used the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) to selected optical (3000 < A < 7000) emission line intensities of 463 confirmed Seyfert 2 AGNs. The oxygen abundance of the NLRs were estimated using the theoretical Storchi-Bergmann et al. calibrations, the semi-empirical N2O2 calibration, the bayesian Hii-Chi-mistry code and the Te-method. We found that the oxygen abundance estimations via the strong-line methods differ from each other up to ~0.8 dex, with the largest discrepancies in the low metallicity regime (12 + log(O/H) . 8.5). We confirmed that the Te-method underestimates the oxygen abundance in NLRs, producing unreal subsolar values. We did not find any correlation between the stellar mass of the host galaxies and the metallicity of their AGNs. This result is independent of the method used to estimate Z.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.04236v1. ArXiv code: 1912.04236. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-09 13:23 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [4.7/4.3]





Comments: 17 pages, 6 figures, submitted to AAS Journals

S. Mau, W. Cerny, A. B. Pace, Y. Choi, A. Drlica-Wagner, L. Santana-Silva, A. H. Riley, D. Erkal, G. S. Stringfellow, M. Adamów, J. L. Carlin, R. A. Gruendl, D. Hernandez-Lang, N. Kuropatkin, T. S. Li, C. E. Martínez-Vázquez et al. 
We report the discovery of two ultra-faint stellar systems found in early data from the DECam Local Volume Exploration survey (DELVE). The first system, Centaurus I (DELVE J1238-4054), is identified as a resolved overdensity of old and metal-poor stars with a heliocentric distance of ${\rm D}_{\odot} = 116.3_{-0.6}^{+0.6}$ kpc, a half-light radius of $r_h = 2.3_{-0.3}^{+0.4}$ arcmin, an age of $\tau > 12.85$ Gyr, a metallicity of $Z = 0.0002_{-0.0002}^{+0.0001}$, and an absolute magnitude of $M_V = -5.55_{-0.11}^{+0.11}$ mag. This characterization is consistent with the population of ultra-faint satellites, and confirmation of this system would make Centaurus I one of the brightest recently discovered ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. Centaurus I is detected in Gaia DR2 with a clear and distinct proper motion signal, confirming that it is a real association of stars distinct from the Milky Way foreground; this is further supported by the clustering of blue horizontal branch stars near the centroid of the system. The second system, DELVE 1 (DELVE J1630-0058), is identified as a resolved overdensity of stars with a heliocentric distance of ${\rm D}_{\odot} = 19.0_{-0.6}^{+0.5} kpc$, a half-light radius of $r_h = 0.97_{-0.17}^{+0.24}$ arcmin, an age of $\tau = 12.5_{-0.7}^{+1.0}$ Gyr, a metallicity of $Z = 0.0005_{-0.0001}^{+0.0002}$, and an absolute magnitude of $M_V = -0.2_{-0.6}^{+0.8}$ mag, consistent with the known population of faint halo star clusters. Given the low number of probable member stars at magnitudes accessible with Gaia DR2, a proper motion signal for DELVE 1 is only marginally detected. We compare the spatial position and proper motion of both Centaurus I and DELVE 1 with simulations of the accreted satellite population of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and find that neither is likely to be associated with the LMC.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03301v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03301. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-06 14:01 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [4.4/3.4]





Comments: 33 pages, 11 figures, 6 tables; submitted to the AAS Journals. Selection functions available at https://github.com/des-science/mw-sats

A. Drlica-Wagner, K. Bechtol, S. Mau, M. McNanna, E. O. Nadler, A. B. Pace, T. S. Li, A. Pieres, E. Rozo, J. D. Simon, A. R. Walker, R. H. Wechsler, T. M. C. Abbott, S. Allam, J. Annis, E. Bertin et al. 
We report the results of a systematic search for ultra-faint Milky Way satellite galaxies using data from the Dark Energy Survey and Pan-STARRS1. Our search covers ~25,000 deg$^2$ of the high-Galactic-latitude sky reaching a 10$\sigma$ point-source depth of $\gtrsim$ 22.5 mag in the $g$ and $r$ bands. We do not detect any new high-significance satellite galaxy candidates, and we characterize the sensitivity of our search using a large set of simulated satellites injected into the survey data. We use these simulations to derive both analytic and machine-learning models that accurately predict the detectability of Milky Way satellites as a function of their distance, size, luminosity, and location on the sky. To demonstrate the utility of this observational selection function, we calculate the luminosity function of Milky Way satellite galaxies assuming that the known population of satellite galaxies is representative of the underlying distribution. We provide access to our observational selection function to facilitate comparisons with cosmological models of galaxy formation and evolution.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03302v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03302. Categories: astro-ph.GA,astro-ph.CO. Submission date: 2019-12-06 14:01 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [5.9/0]





Comments: 19 pages, 20 figures, submitted to MNRAS

Sijie Yu, James S. Bullock, Andrew Wetzel, Robyn E. Sanderson, Andrew S. Graus, Michael Boylan-Kolchin, Anna M. Nierenberg, Michael Y. Gurdić, Philip F. Hopkins, Dušan Kereš, Claude-André Faucher-Giguère
We study stellar-halo formation using six Milky Way-mass galaxies in FIRE-2 cosmological zoom simulations. We find that $5-40\%$ of the outer ($50-300$ kpc) stellar halo in each system consists of $\textit{in-situ}$ stars that were born in outflows from the main galaxy. Outflow stars originate from gas accelerated by super-bubble winds, which can be compressed, cool, and form co-moving stars. The majority of these stars remain bound to the halo and fall back with orbital properties similar to the rest of the stellar halo at $z=0$.In the outer halo, outflow stars are more spatially homogeneous, metal rich, and alpha-element-enhanced than the accreted stellar halo. At the solar location, up to $\sim 10 \%$ of our kinematically-identified halo stars were born in outflows; the fraction rises to as high as $\sim 40\%$ for the most metal-rich local halo stars ([Fe/H] $> -0.5$). We conclude that the Milky Way stellar halo could contain local counterparts to stars that are observed to form in molecular outflows in distant galaxies. Searches for such a population may provide a new, near-field approach to constraining feedback and outflow physics. A stellar halo contribution from outflows is a phase-reversal of the classic halo formation scenario of Eggen, Lynden-Bell $\&$ Sandange, who suggested that halo stars formed in rapidly $\textit{infalling}$ gas clouds. Stellar outflows may be observable in direct imaging of external galaxies and could provide a source for metal-rich, extreme velocity stars in the Milky Way.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03316v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03316. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-06 14:00 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [5.6/0]





Comments: 23 pages, 10 figures, 6 tables. Accepted for publication in MNRAS

R. Marques-Chaves, I. Pérez-Fournon, Y. Shu, L. Colina, A. Bolton, J. Álvarez-Márquez, J. Brownstein, M. Cornachione, S. Geier, C. Jiménez-Ángel, T. Kojima, S. Mao, A. Montero-Dorta, M. Oguri, M. Ouchi, F. Poidevin et al. 
We present deep rest-frame UV spectroscopic observations using the Gran Telescopio Canarias of six gravitationally lensed Lya emitters (LAEs) at $2.36<z<2.82$ selected from the BELLS GALLERY survey. By taking the magnifications into account, we show that LAEs can be as luminous as L(Lya) = 30x10$^{42}$ erg s-1 and M(UV) = -23 (AB) without invoking an AGN component, in contrast with previous findings. We measure Lya rest-frame equivalent widths, EW(Lya), ranging from 16\AA to 50\AA and Lya escape fractions, fesc(Lya), from 10% to 40%. Large EW(Lya) and fesc(Lya) are found predominantly in LAEs showing weak low-ionization ISM absorption (EW < 1\AA) and narrow Lya profiles (< 300 km s-1 FWHM) with their peak close (< 80 km s-1) to their systemic redshifts, suggestive of less scatter from low HI column densities that favours the escape of Lya photons. We infer stellar metallicities of Z/Zsun ~ 0.2 in almost all LAEs by comparing the P-Cygni profiles of the wind lines NV1240\AA and CIV1549\AA with those from stellar synthesis models. We also find a trend between M(UV) and the velocity offset of ISM absorption lines, such as the most luminous LAEs experience stronger outflows. The most luminous LAEs show star formation rates up to 180 Msun yr-1, yet they appear relatively blue ($\beta$(UV) ~ -1.8 to -2.0) showing evidence of little dust attenuation (E(B-V) = 0.10-0.14). These luminous LAEs may be particular cases of young starburst galaxies that have had no time to form large amounts of dust. If so, they are ideal laboratories to study the early phase of massive star formation, stellar and dust mass growth, and chemical enrichment histories of starburst galaxies at high-z.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.04033v1. ArXiv code: 1912.04033. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-12-09 08:37 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [5.1/0]





Comments: 21 pages, 12 figures, 1 table; submitted to MNRAS; comments welcome

Yuchan Wang, Baojiu Li, Marius Cautun
Observations of galaxy clustering are made in redshift space, which results in distortions to the underlying isotropic distribution of galaxies. These redshift-space distortions (RSD) not only degrade important features of the matter density field, such as the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) peaks, but also pose challenges for the theoretical modelling of observational probes. Here we introduce an iterative nonlinear reconstruction algorithm to remove RSD effects from galaxy clustering measurements, and assess its performance by using mock galaxy catalogues. The new method is found to be able to recover the real-space galaxy correlation function, and reduce the quadrupole moment to zero, with a $\sim1\%$ accuracy, on scales $s\gtrsim15$-$20h^{-1}{\rm Mpc}$. It also leads to an improvement in the reconstruction of the initial density field, which could help to accurately locate the BAO peaks. An 'internal calibration' scheme is proposed to determine the values of cosmological parameters as a part of the reconstruction process, and possibilities to break parameter degeneracies are discussed. RSD reconstruction can offer a potential way to simultaneously extract the cosmological parameters, initial density field, real-space galaxy positions and large-scale peculiar velocity field (of the real Universe), making it an alternative to standard perturbative approaches in galaxy clustering analysis, bypassing the need for RSD modelling.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.03392v1. ArXiv code: 1912.03392. Categories: astro-ph.CO. Submission date: 2019-12-06 18:37 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [4.6/0]





Comments: 35 pages, 10 figures, 2 tables

Chiara Arina, Ankit Beniwal, Céline Degrande, Jan Heisig, Andre Scaffidi
We perform a global fit within the pseudo-Nambu-Goldstone dark matter (DM) model emerging from an additional complex scalar singlet with a softly broken global U(1) symmetry. Leading to a momentum-suppressed DM-nucleon cross section at tree level, the model provides a natural explanation for the null results from direct detection experiments. Our global fit combines constraints from perturbative unitarity, DM relic abundance, Higgs invisible decay, electroweak precision observables and latest Higgs searches at colliders. The results are presented in both frequentist and Bayesian statistical frameworks. Furthermore, post-processing our samples, we include the likelihood from gamma-ray observations of $\mathit{Fermi}$-LAT dwarf spheroidal galaxies and compute the one-loop DM-nucleon cross section. We find two favoured regions characterised by their dominant annihilation channel: the Higgs funnel and annihilation into Higgs pairs. Both are compatible with current $\mathit{Fermi}$-LAT observations, and furthermore, can fit the slight excess observed in four dwarfs in a mass range between about 30-300 GeV. While the former region is hard to probe experimentally, the latter can partly be tested by current observations of cosmic-ray antiprotons as well as future gamma-ray observations.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1912.04008v1. ArXiv code: 1912.04008. Categories: hep-ph,astro-ph.CO. Submission date: 2019-12-09 07:58 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 10 Dec morning. Score (entry/author): [4.7/1.3]







Updates/revised versions with keyword match


Comments: Main text: 23 pages, 11 figures. Appendix: 12 pages, 11 figures. Accepted for publication on MNRAS

Mirko Curti et al.
     


Comments: 21 pages, 13 figures. Accepted for publication on MNRAS. V2: Equation (3) corrected

Mirko Curti et al.
     


Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A. 11 pages, 8 figures, 1 table

A. Boehm et al.
     


Comments: 10 pages, 7 figures. Accepted to be published in MNRAS

Sambit K. Giri et al.
     


Comments: 8 pages, 4 figures. Submitted to ApJL. All comments are welcome

Adam L. Schaefer et al.
     


Comments: 24 pages, 13 figures, accepted for publication in ApJ

Zhiyuan Ji et al.
     


Comments: 17 pages, 6 figures, Minor changes to mach published MNRAS version

Oscar Agertz et al.
     


Comments: 7 pages, 6 figures; matches the published version

Tousif Islam et al.
     




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List of categories:
(include/exclude)

A submission with keyword match will be displayed in the main list if (1) at least one category in the submission appears in the 'include' list, and (2) if there is no category in the submission appearing in the 'exclude' list.

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Check categories at arxiv.org. Other categories can be added on request.
Alphabetically sorted list of keywords:

Link name:


Remember to bookmark new link as it appears

Find new keywords relevant to your research: (and be patient)

List submissions from     (full: author scores calculated for all papers including those with no keyword match; do not use the resulting URL as bookmark, use instead the form above to obtain the link)

List submissions between (incl.) and (incl.)   (full: author scores calculated for all papers even those with no keyword match [much much longer loading time])

Test keywords and score in specific arXiv ID:

URL syntax: categories and keywords are separated by [;] / [cat=] included categories (submissions matching at least one of these will be displayed) / [excat=] excluded categories (submissions with one of these will be excluded; overrides [cat]) / [q=] keywords to match
Page processed from: http://export.arxiv.org/api/query?search_query=(cat:astro-ph*)+AND+lastUpdatedDate:[201912061900+TO+201912091900]&sortBy=lastUpdatedDate&sortOrder=descending&max_results=5000

(astro-ph, hep-th, hep-ph, gr-qc, arXiv, preprints, preprint, pre-print, pre-prints, listing, listings, personalized, custom, paper, papers, article, articles, astrophysique, astrophysics, astro)

bmarxiv : For any comments please contact V. Lebouteiller (Laboratoire AIM - CEA/Saclay).