Bad Mood arXiv

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bmarxiv
Now [arXiv timezone]: Tue 20 Aug 23:29 / Requested listing: Tue 20 Aug / Checking submissions between Fri 16 Aug and Mon 19 Aug [EST]
BMarXiv

This page allows you to scan the arXiv listings for selected keywords. A score around 100 is probably your own paper!

How to use
- Use the settings at the bottom of the page and bookmark the resulting link as it appears.
Tips & examples
- Submissions not matching your keywords can be accessed with a button below the results. / Keywords are looked for in the summary but also in the title and in the authors names. / Links open by default in a new tab. / If you use several custom links, give them a name using the optional parameter for the bookmarks to be explicit.
- example link
from www.mrbilly.com

Keywords:
galaxies
Categories:
astro-ph*


Number of submissions with keyword match: 17/131, including 12 new submissions



Submissions with keyword match



Comments: 13 pages, 14 figures, submitted to MNRAS, comments are welcome

M. L. L. Dantas, P. R. T. Coelho, R. S. de Souza, T. S. Gonçalves
The so-called ultraviolet (UV) upturn of elliptical galaxies is a phenomenon characterised by the up-rise of their fluxes in bluer wavelengths, typically in the 1,200-2,500A range. This work aims at estimating the rate of occurrence of the UV upturn over the entire red-sequence population of galaxies that show significant UV emission. This assessment is made considering it as function of three parameters: redshift, stellar mass, and -- what may seem counter-intuitive at first -- emission-line classification. We built a multiwavelength spectro-photometric catalogue from the Galaxy Mass Assembly survey, together with aperture-matched data from Galaxy Evolution Explorer and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, covering the redshift range between 0.06 and 0.40. From this sample, we analyse the UV emission among UV bright galaxies, by selecting those that occupy the red-sequence locus in the (NUV-r) x (FUV-NUV) chart; then, we stratify the sample by their emission-line classes. To that end, we make use of emission-line diagnostic diagrams, focusing the analysis in retired/passive lineless galaxies. Then, a Bayesian logistic model was built to simultaneously deal with the effects of all galaxy properties including emission-line classification or lack thereof). The main results show that retired/passive systems host an up-rise in the fraction of UV upturn or redshifts between 0.06 and 0.25, followed by an in-fall up to 0.35. Additionally, we show that the fraction of UV upturn hosts rises with increasing stellar mass.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06775v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06775. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-08-19 09:05 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [10.4/6.1]





Comments: Accepted for publication in ApJ Letters

Biny Sebastian, Omkar Bait
We present a radio continuum study of a population of extremely young and starburst galaxies, termed as blueberries at ${\sim}$ 1 GHz using the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT). We find that their radio-based star formation rate (SFR) is suppressed by a factor of ${\sim}$ 3.4 compared to the SFR based on optical emission lines. This might be due to (i) the young ages of these galaxies as a result of which a stable equilibrium via feedback from supernovae has not yet been established (ii) escape of cosmic ray electrons via diffusion or galactic scale outflows. The estimated non-thermal fraction in these galaxies has a median value of ${\sim}$0.49, which is relatively lower than that in normal star-forming galaxies at such low frequencies. Their inferred equipartition magnetic field has a median value of 27 ${\mu}$G, which is higher than those in more evolved systems like spiral galaxies. Such high magnetic fields suggest that small-scale dynamo rather than large-scale dynamo mechanisms might be playing a major role in amplifying magnetic fields in these galaxies.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06410v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06410. Categories: astro-ph.GA,astro-ph.CO. Submission date: 2019-08-18 05:36 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [11.4/2]





Comments: 15 pages, 12 Figures; submitted

Marco Palla, Francesco Calura, XiLong Fan, Francesca Matteucci, Fiorenzo Vincenzo, Elena Lacchin
We apply a top-heavy integrated galactic initial mass function (IGIMF) to the chemical evolution of spheroids and compare our results with high redshift starburst galaxies. These objects are, in fact, very likely to be elliptical galaxies suffering their main burst of star formation. These bursts are very intense and more massive objects suffer more intense star formation than less massive ones (downsizing in star formation). The high star formation rate produces a galactic wind, due to stellar feedback, and devoids the galaxy of the gas residual from star formation. This happens sooner for more massive galaxies (inverse wind model), ensuring the reproduction of the mass-Z relation and the [$\alpha$/Fe]-mass relation in local ellipticals. We compute the chemical evolution, including also a detailed dust treatment, of $\alpha$-elements, Fe, C and N, and we compare our results with the available data for high redshift starburst galaxies. Our main conclusions are: i) the top-heavy IGIMF enhances the rate of star formation; in particular, different $\beta$ (parameter related to the slope of the embedded cluster mass function) determine different times for the occurrence of the galactic wind. The $\beta=1$ value is rejected since it produces models which do not satisfy the condition of the inverse wind model, whereas for $\beta>1$ the inverse wind is preserved. ii) Abundance data are in general better reproduced by models adopting the top-heavy IGIMF than a classical Salpeter IMF. iii) The abundance ratios of refractory elements relative to Fe can be explained only by assuming the presence of dust.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06832v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06832. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-08-19 10:34 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [5.9/3.3]





Comments: 9 pages, 4 tables, 5 figures, submitted to A&A

E. Kun, Z. Keresztes, L. Á. Gergely
We assemble a database of 12 dwarf galaxies, for which optical (R-band) and near-infrared ($3.6\mu m$) surface brightness density together with spectroscopic rotation curve data are available, in order to test the slowly rotating Bose-Einstein Condensate (srBEC) dark matter model. We aim to establish the angular velocity range compatible with observations, bounded from above by the requirement of finite size halos, to check the modelfits with the dataset, and the universality of the BEC halo parameter $\mathcal{R}$. We construct the spatial luminosity density of the stellar component of the dwarf galaxies based on their $3.6\mu m$ and R-band surface brightness profiles, assuming an axisymmetric baryonic mass distribution. We build up the gaseous component by employing a truncated disk model. We fit a baryonic plus dark matter combined model, parametrized by the M/L ratios of the baryonic components and parameters of the srBEC (the central density $\rho_c$, size of the static BEC halo $\mathcal{R}$, angular velocity $\omega$) to the rotation curves. The $3.6\mu m$ surface brightness of 6 galaxies indicates the presence of a bulge and a disk component. The shape of the $3.6\mu m$ and R-band spatial mass density profiles being similar is consistent with the stellar mass of the galaxies emerging wavelength-independent. The srBEC model fits the rotation curve of 11 galaxies out of 12 within $1\sigma$ significance level, with the average of $\mathcal{R}$ as 7.51 kpc and standard deviation of 2.96 kpc. This represents an improvement over the static BEC modelfit. For the well-fitting 11 galaxies the angular velocities allowing for a finite size srBEC halo are $<2.2\times 10^{-16}$ 1/s. For a scattering length of the BEC particle of $a\approx 10^6$ fm, the mass of the BEC particle is slightly better constrained than in the static case as $m\in[1.26\times10^{-17}\div3.08\times10^{-17}]$ eV/c$^2$.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06489v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06489. Categories: astro-ph.GA,gr-qc. Submission date: 2019-08-18 13:41 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [10.4/1.6]





Comments: Accepted to MNRAS on August 13th 2019. 11 pages, 12 figures, 1 Appendix

Melanie L. Demers, Laura C. Parker, Ian D. Roberts
We investigate the dependence of stellar disc scale lengths on environment for a sample of Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 galaxies with published photometric bulge-disc decompositions. We compare disc scale lengths at fixed bulge mass for galaxies in an isolated field environment to galaxies in X-ray rich and X-ray poor groups. At low bulge mass, stellar disc scale lengths in X-ray rich groups are smaller compared to discs in both X-ray poor groups and in isolated field environments. This decrease in disc scale length is largely independent of halo mass, though shows some dependence on group-centric distance. We also find that stellar disc scale lengths are smaller in X-ray rich environments for a subset of star-forming galaxies and for galaxies of different morphological types. We note that disc scale lengths of low mass galaxies are known to have large systematic uncertainties, however we focus on differences between samples with the same measurement biases. Our results show that stellar disc scale lengths depend on X-ray brightness, a tracer of IGM density, suggesting a role for hydrodynamic processes such as ram-pressure stripping and/or starvation.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06810v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06810. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-08-19 10:04 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [6.7/0]





Comments: 28 pages, 15 figures, 2 tables; submitted to the Astrophysical Journal on 19 August 2019

Nandini Sahu, Alister W. Graham, Benjamin L. Davis
Using 143 early- and late-type galaxies (ETGs and LTGs) with directly-measured super-massive black hole masses ($M_{BH}$), we build upon our previous discoveries that: (i) LTGs, most of which have been alleged to contain a pseudobulge, follow the relation $M_{BH}\propto\,M_{*,sph}^{2.16\pm0.32}$; and (ii) the ETG relation $M_{BH}\propto M_{*,sph}^{1.27\pm0.07}$ is an artifact of ETGs with/without disks following parallel $M_{BH}\propto\,M_{*,sph}^{1.9\pm0.2}$ relations which are offset by an order of magnitude in the $M_{BH}$-direction. Here we searched for substructure in the $M_{BH}$-(central velocity dispersion, $\sigma$) diagram using our recently published, multi-component, galaxy decompositions; investigating divisions based on the presence of a depleted stellar core (major dry-merger), a disk (minor wet/dry-merger, gas accretion), or a bar (evolved unstable disk). The S\'ersic and core-S\'ersic galaxies define two distinct relations: $M_{BH}\propto\sigma^{5.86\pm0.33}$ and $M_{BH}\propto\sigma^{8.54\pm1.07}$, with $\Delta_{rms|BH}=0.51$ and 0.47 dex, respectively. We also report on the consistency with the slopes and bends in the galaxy luminosity ($L$)-$\sigma$ relation due to S\'ersic and core-S\'ersic ETGs, and LTGs which all have S\'ersic light-profiles. The bend in the $M_{BH}$-$\sigma$ diagram (superficially) reappears upon separating galaxies with/without a disk, while we find no significant offset between barred and non-barred galaxies, nor between galaxies with/without active galactic nuclei. We also address selection biases purported to affect the scaling relations for dynamically-measured $M_{BH}$ samples. These new, type-dependent, $M_{BH}$-$\sigma$ relations more precisely estimate $M_{BH}$ in other galaxies, and hold implications for galaxy/black hole co-evolution theories, simulations, feedback, and calibration of virial $f$-factors. (Abridged)

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06838v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06838. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-08-19 10:44 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [6.1/0]





Comments: Accepted to MDPI Galaxy special issue, "Luminous Stars in Nearby Galaxies." Editor: Roberta Humphreys

Kathryn F. Neugent, Philip Massey
Wolf-Rayet stars (WRs) represent the end of a massive star's life as it is about to turn into a supernova. Obtaining complete samples of such stars across a large range of metallicities poses observational challenges, but presents us with an exacting way to test current stellar evolutionary theories. A technique we have developed and refined involves interference filter imaging combined with image subtraction and crowded-field photometry. This helps us address one of the most controversial topics in current massive star research: the relative importance of binarity in the evolution of massive stars and formation of WRs. Here we discuss the current state of the field, including how the observed WR populations match with the predictions of both single and binary star evolutionary models. We end with what we believe are the most important next steps in WR research.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06238v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06238. Categories: astro-ph.SR,astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-08-17 00:40 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [5.1/0.9]





Comments: 15 pages, 7 figures, 7 tables, accepted for publication in ApJ

Connor Stone, Stephane Courteau
We present a detailed Monte Carlo model of observational errors in observed galaxy scaling relations to recover the intrinsic (cosmic) scatter driven by galaxy formation and evolution processes. We apply our method to the stellar radial acceleration relation (RAR) which compares the local observed radial acceleration to the local Newtonian radial acceleration computed from the stellar mass distribution. The stellar and baryonic RAR are known to exhibit similar scatter. Lelli+2017 (L17) studied the baryonic RAR using a sample of 153 spiral galaxies and inferred a negligible intrinsic scatter. If true, a small scatter might challenge the LCDM galaxy formation paradigm, possibly favoring a modified Newtonian dynamics interpretation. The intrinsic scatter of the baryonic RAR is predicted by modern LCDM simulations to be ~0.06-0.08 dex, contrasting with the null value reported by L17. We have assembled a catalog of structural properties with over 2500 spiral galaxies from six deep imaging and spectroscopic surveys (called the "Photometry and Rotation curve OBservations from Extragalactic Surveys") to quantify the intrinsic scatter of the stellar RAR and other scaling relations. The stellar RAR for our full sample has a median observed scatter of 0.17 dex. We use our Monte Carlo method, which accounts for all major sources of measurement uncertainty, to infer a contribution of 0.12 dex from the observational errors. The intrinsic scatter of the stellar RAR is thus estimated to be 0.11$\pm$0.02 dex, in agreement with, though slightly greater than, current LCDM predictions.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06105v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06105. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-08-16 14:00 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [5.2/0]





Comments:

G. I. Günthardt, R. J. Díaz, M. P. Agüero, G. Gimeno, H. Dottori, J. A. Camperi
We present Br$\gamma$ emission line kinematics of the nuclear region of NGC 253, recently known to host a strong galactic wind that limits the global star formation of the galaxy. We obtained high-resolution long-slit spectroscopic data with PHOENIX at Gemini-South, positioning the slit on the nucleus Infrared Core (IRC), close to the nuclear disk major axis. The spatial resolution was 0.35"($\sim$6 pc) and the slit length 14"($\sim$240 pc). The spectral resolution was $\sim$74000, unprecedented high for galactic nuclei observations at $\sim$2.1$\mu$m. The line profiles appear highly complex, with blue asymmetry up to 3.5'' away of the IRC, and red asymmetries further away to NE. Several Gaussian components are necessary to fit the profile, nevertheless a narrow and a wide ones predominate. The IRC presents kinematic widths above 700 kms$^{-1}$ (FWZI), and broad component FWHM$\sim$400 kms$^{-1}$, the highest detected in a nearby galaxy. At the IRC, the blue-shifted broad component displays a 90 km s$^{-1}$ bump in radial velocity distribution, a feature we previously detected in molecular gas kinematics. The narrow component velocity dispersion ($\sim$32 kms$^{-1}$) is within the expected for normal galaxies and LIRGs. Intermediate components (FWHM$\sim$150 kms$^{-1}$, red-shifted to NE, blue-shifted to SW) appear at some positions, as well as weaker blue (-215 kms$^{-1}$) and red line wings (+300 kms$^{-1}$). The IRC depicts a large broad vs. narrow line flux-ratio (F(B)/F(N)$\sim$1.35), and the broad component seems only comparable with those observed at very high star-forming rate galaxies. The results indicate that the IRC would be the main source of the galactic winds originated in the central region of NGC 253.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06538v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06538. Categories: astro-ph.GA. Submission date: 2019-08-18 19:28 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [5.1/0]





Comments: Contribution to the International Cosmic Ray Conference ICRC 2019. 8 pages, 3 figures. A couple of errors in Table 1 have been corrected

Alberto Carramiñana, Daniel Rosa González, Sara Coutiño de León, Anna Lia Longinotti
The High Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory has been accumulating a progressively deeper exposure of the TeV sky since its inauguration in March 2015. Located at geographical latitude $+19^\circ$N, HAWC has been able to perform a deep and unbiased survey of two thirds of the sky. We analyzed three years of HAWC data searching for long term persistent emission from a redshift limited ($z\leq 0.3$) sample of active galactic nuclei drawn from the {\it Fermi}-LAT 3FHL catalog. The HAWC dataset confirms the high significance detection of the two nearest BL Lac objects, \mbox{Mrk 421} and \mbox{Mrk 501}, and sets limits for the rest of the sample, down to integrated photon fluxes of order $N(>0.5~{\rm TeV})\lesssim 10^{-12}\,\rm cm^{-2}s^{-1}$. We present and discuss some of the results of this survey, focusing on individual objects of particular interest.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06831v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06831. Categories: astro-ph.HE. Submission date: 2019-08-19 10:32 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [5.1/0]





Comments: 12 pages, 2 Figs., accepted in MNRAS

Nathan Smith
Luminous blue variables (LBVs) are suprisingly isolated from the massive O-type stars that are their putative progenitors in single-star evolution, implicating LBVs as binary evolution products. Aadland et al. (A19) found that LBVs are, however, only marginally more dispersed than a photometrically selected sample of bright blue stars (BBS) in the LMC, leading them to suggest that LBV environments may not exclude a single-star origin. In both comparisons, LBVs have the same median separation, confirming that any incompleteness in the O-star sample does not fabricate LBV isolation. Instead, the relative difference arises because the photometric BBS sample is far more dispersed than known O-type stars. Evidence suggests that the large BBS separation arises because it traces less massive (~20 Msun), aging blue supergiants. Although photometric criteria used by A19 aimed to select only the most massive unevolved stars, visual-wavelength color selection cannot avoid contamination because O and early B stars have almost the same intrinsic color. Spectral types confirm that the BBS sample contains many B supergiants. Moreover, the observed BBS separation distribution matches that of spectroscopically confirmed early B supergiants, not O-type stars, and matches predictions for a ~10 Myr population, not a 3-4 Myr population. A broader implication for ages of stellar populations is that bright blue stars are not a good tracer of the youngest massive O-type stars. Bright blue stars in nearby galaxies (and unresolved blue light in distant galaxies) generally trace evolved blue supergiants akin to SN 1987A's progenitor.

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.06104v1. ArXiv code: 1908.06104. Categories: astro-ph.SR,astro-ph.HE. Submission date: 2019-08-16 14:00 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [5.1/0]





Comments: e.g.: 10 pages, 8 Figures, Accepted for publication in MNRAS

M. Samadi, S. Zangeneh, S. Abbassi
The classical Bondi model is adopted to study accretion onto the finite luminous region around the central massive black hole (MBH) in an elliptical galaxy. Unlike Bondi (1952), we define the boundary conditions at a certain finite radius ($r_f$) instead of at the infinity and examine the variation of solutions for a simple case. In the following, we consider the special case of an MBH at the center of a Hernquist galaxy and involve the gravity and luminosity of its own galaxy. Our results in the first part show that kinetic energy at the final radius is ignorable even for not so far away from the center. Moreover, the mass accretion rate will be approximately equal to its Bondi value if the final radius ($r_f$) becomes about 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than semi-Bondi radius, i.e. $GM/c_{sf}^2$ (where $M$ and $c_{sf}$ are the mass of the central object and the sound speed at $r_f$). In the second part, adding the two extra forces of gravity and radiation in the momentum equation let us know that the maximum possible of accretion rate increases with a greater characteristic linear density of galaxy and lower radiation. e.g.:

Link: http://arxiv.org/abs/1908.07356v1. ArXiv code: 1908.07356. Categories: astro-ph.HE. Submission date: 2019-08-19 09:12 [EST] -- Appeared on listing from Tue 20 Aug morning. Score (entry/author): [4.8/0]







Updates/revised versions with keyword match


Comments: MNRAS, see also companion paper by Pillepich et al. (2019b). Visualizations, movies, and an image gallery of paper figures available on the TNG50 website: www.tng-project.org

Dylan Nelson et al.
     


Comments: Accepted for publication in A&A (August 12, 2019). 18 pages, 19 figures, 4 tables, plus appendices (11 pages, 6 figures, 1 table)

Simón Díaz-García et al.
     


Comments: To appear in Proceedings of the 36th International Cosmic Ray Conference

Luis A. Anchordoqui et al.
     


Comments: 17 pages, 10 figures, 3 tables

Yutong Duan et al.
     


Comments: 19 pages, 8 figures

Rachel Gray et al.
     




Submissions with no keyword match


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Score of entry is calculated using occurences of keywords, with some corrections due to repetitions and length of abstract. If author score is calculated, the list of recent submissions by the first author will also be scanned. Unwanted categories result in the entry not showing in the main result section. If the entry has more categories than the required categories, the score will be decreased.
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